Our Story

Vision

Rematriation is the realization of twenty years of dreaming by our Founder, Michelle Schenandoah. While riding the NYC subway as a young, Oneida woman in her early 20s, she noticed Black and Latina women enjoying magazines designed just for them. As an Indigenous woman she wondered, “Where’s my magazine?” Two decades later in 2017, Shenandoah founded Rematriation Magazine as the answer to this question. Today, Rematriation is a multi-media initiative engaging in film production, digital content creation and community engagement. Rematriation is the home of Rematriation Magazine and, most importantly, a community of Haudenosaunee and Indigenous women choosing to heal together. We continue to re-imagine the ways in which a “magazine” can shift narratives, defy stereotypes, and reflect our own experiences.

About

Rematriation is a Haudenosaunee-led, digital storytelling platform connecting Haudenosaunee and Indigenous women across Turtle Island and around the world. We rematriate through Indigenous women-led, in person gatherings; online, Indigenous women-only spaces; and initiatives designed to educate the public and build allies.

Dream

Rematriation is the realization of twenty years of dreaming by our Founder, Michelle Schenandoah. While riding the NYC subway as a young, Oneida woman in her early 20s, she noticed Black and Latina women enjoying magazines designed just for them. As an Indigenous woman she wondered, “Where’s my magazine?” Two decades later in 2017, Shenandoah founded Rematriation Magazine as the answer to this question. Today, Rematriation is a multi-media initiative engaging in film production, digital content creation and community engagement. Rematriation is the home of Rematriation Magazine and, most importantly, a community of Haudenosaunee and Indigenous women choosing to heal together. We continue to re-imagine the ways in which a “magazine” can shift narratives, defy stereotypes, and reflect our own experiences.

Our Team

Michelle Schenandoah

Founder

Kaluhyanu:wes “She is Fond of the Sky”
Onʌyota’:aka (Oneida)

Michelle is an inspirational speaker, writer, thought leader and traditional member of the Onʌyota’:aka (Oneida) Nation Wolf Clan of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. She is the founder of Rematriation and the non-profit Kanenhi:io Ionkwaienthos. Raised in a family of traditional leadership, she carries the values and responsibilities of being Haudenosaunee throughout her life. Inspired by her grandmothers who led generations of Oneida Nation land claims, Michelle carries her ancestors’ passion to rematriate her people’s lands and bring about the truthful telling of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy’s influence on the world.

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Michelle’s life experiences paved the way for her to found Rematriation in 2016. As a traditional member of the Longhouse, a trained lawyer and a visionary for change, Michelle creates space for Indigenous voices to be honored fully with light and love. Most recently, as Founder of Rematriation, Michelle directed and produced the Rematriation films: An Indigenous Response to #MeToo and the 10-part series, Indigenous Women’s Voices, with Mohawk Director, Katsitsionni Fox. Through her storytelling as a filmmaker, writer and speaker, Michelle creates safe spaces to share tools and resources that she has learned from her own healing journey and lived experiences.

She is co-founder, owner and principal at Indigenous Concepts Consulting with her husband, Neal Powless, she helps non-Indigenous businesses and media companies develop their own organizational best practices through an Indigenous lens. She holds a JD and LL.M. in Taxation from New York Law School, a MS from the S.I. Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University, and a BA from Cornell University. Throughout her career, Michelle has advised tribal governments across Turtle Island, studied facilitation and healing methods in a variety of traditions and worked for numerous non-profits, including: The American Indian College Fund and Children of the Earth.

Michelle is a current board member for the Everson Museum of Art. She has previously served as President of the Board of Directors for the non-profit, Seven Dancers Coalition and as a board member for the NAMMYS where she helped establish the Native Music category in the GRAMMYS.

She lives on her people’s homelands with her husband and their four beautiful children.

Rachel Arlene Redeye Porter

Editor-In-Chief

Onöndowa’ga:’ (Seneca)

Rachel (She/Her) is a millennial writer, storyteller, and thinker of Seneca and mixed European ancestry. She identifies as both Indigenous and mixed and holds the teachings of the Guswenta (Two Row Wampum Belt) close to her heart. She is named after her maternal grandmother Arlene Stoker and her paternal grandmother Lana Redeye (Seneca, Heron Clan). She views her work at Rematriation as an extension of her sacred responsibilities as a Haudenosaunee woman and is honored to work alongside a dedicated and purpose-driven team.

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Rachel is a longtime advocate for climate justice, Indigenous rights, and story-based advocacy. In addition to her work at Rematriation, she is an ongoing contributor at Our Climate Voices, a youth-led, climate storytelling project. In 2020, she co-founded Kneading Change, an organization that focuses on narrative change through liberation-based education, coaching and consulting. She earned a Master’s degree from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University in 2017 where she focused on Gender Analysis in International Relations, human security and Indigenous coalition building.  Rachel’s work is unified by a vision to create more content that reflects our worldview and experiences as Onkwehonwe. Her dream is to create a world where Indigenous children see themselves represented and never feel alone.

Rachel lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico with her partner, artist Adriano Rodrigues, and their three cats: Coco, Chloe and Aqua. She is currently pursuing an MFA in Creative Non-Fiction at the Institute of American Indian Arts.

Sheri Doxtator

Community Engagement Manager

Teyotawuli “Travelling Woman”
Onʌyota’:aka (Oneida)

Teyotawuli Sheri Dee is a A’no:wál (Turtle Clan) member of the Oneida Nation also known as the People of the Standing Stone. She is the granddaughter of Elsie and Manson, Christina, Ron and Evan; sister to Gwen, Krista and Myeengun; and Auntie to 5 nieces, 4 nephews and 1 great nephew. Throughout her career, Sheri has served her people in many roles including as an elected council member and as Yehsʌnowá:nʌ (YAY SIN NO WAN meaning Elected Chief) for the Oneida Nation of the Thames. 

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In addition to serving within her Nation government, she has used her skills in professional fundraising, business and corporate development, workshop facilitation and Indigneous politics to provide strategic guidance and organizational support to the Iroquois Caucus, the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, the National Indigenous Women’s Summit 2017, the Indigenous Women in Leadership-Ontario, Chiefs of Ontario, Southern First Nations Secretariat, and Can-Am Indian Friendship Centre, among others.

Sheri is currently pursuing an academic career in the justice sector, serves as lead Matriarchal Influencer at her company Doxtator Enterprise and sits on the board of Toronto Green Community, the Six Nations Benevolent Association, the St.Thomas Community Leadership Cabinet and the Oneida Agricultural Society. She brings her experience and vision for a bright future for future generations to her new role as Community Engagement Manager at Rematriation Magazine. Outside of work, Sheri enjoys reading, yoga, watching NASCAR racing, photography, videography, volunteering and travelling. She currently resides on her ancestral lands in what is now called southwestern Ontario, Canada.

Diane Schenandoah

Advisor & Content Contributor

Tekahnatshyali:te
Onʌyota’:aka (Oneida)

A Faithkeeper of the Oneida Nation, Diane is a traditional titleholder who carries the responsibility of upholding, sharing and honoring Haudenosaunee spirituality and lifeways. She was born into a large Haudenosaunee family and resides in her ancestral Onʌyota’:aka (Oneida) Nation homelands in upstate New York. She is the daughter of the late Clifford Schenandoah, who was an Onondaga Nation Pine Tree Chief and jazz musician; and the late Maisie Shenandoah, an Oneida Nation Wolf Clan Mother.

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Her parents were both artists and encouraged Diane and her siblings to pursue their talents and gifts in the arts. In 2011, she graduated cum laude from Syracuse University with her Bachelor’s in sculpture. Her work has been exhibited around the world, from the White House, to the Vatican, to Lincoln Center and the New York State Museum. Recently, she served as a consulting sculptural artist for the Haudenosaunee representation in the Congressional Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission’s sculpture in Seneca Falls, NY. 

In the early 1980s, Diane lived in New Mexico and attended Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) in Albuquerque and the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe. There, she fell in love with 3-dimensional arts. Today, she works in several mediums including: clay, wood, bone, stone, shell, and bronze. She also designs traditional items such as cradle boards, rattles and furniture with a traditional contemporary flair.

Diane is a backup singer and percussionist for her sister and internationally renowned singer/songwriter, Joanne Shenandoah. Together they have travelled the world performing and exhibiting her artwork. Diane is mother to Rematriation founder Michelle Schenandoah; she also has four sons and many beautiful grandchildren.

Afton Paulena Lewis

New Media Creator

Diné

Afton is a Gen Z, Navajo Filmmaker originally from Albuquerque, New Mexico. She is a member of the Navajo Nation and of the Mud People Clan born for the Coyote Pass Clan. Afton was inspired to join the film industry while taking classes at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She is an emerging film editor, cinematographer and producer.

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Afton’s interest in filmmaking began as a young child when she watched films that her grandparents made for their grandchildren. To date, she has created and directed several video projects and is now sharing these skills with Rematriation. For over a year, Afton has been a production assistant on Rematriation Media projects and most recently took on a leading role in our social media engagement. Afton has been featured in the Daily Orange and dreams of increasing Indigenous representation in the film industry.

Afton currently lives on the Onʌyota’:aka (Oneida) homelands with her boyfriend Cameron and mother-in-law Diane Schenandoah.